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Discovering unspoiled Myanmar

After preparing the campfire breakfast for the family, Hayma, the wife of Manue (her name means “forest” in Burmese) spends her morning hours cutting and laminating bamboo stalks into sheets and planks that serve as new walls for their small hut. Every year by the end of the monsoon rains, the bamboo planks have to be replaced and renewed to offer proper shelter for the family. Hamya explains that weaving bamboo is one of the ancestors’ techniques in the Shan Region: not only it shelters and protects us during the cold nights, but it also allows for the passage of the river breeze during the hot days.

MYANMAR | Thursday, 4 July 2013 | Views [620] | View Larger Image

After preparing the campfire breakfast for the family, Hayma, the wife of Manue (her name means “forest” in Burmese) spends her morning hours cutting and laminating bamboo stalks into sheets and planks that serve as new walls for their small hut. Every year by the end of the monsoon rains, the bamboo planks have to be replaced and renewed to offer proper shelter for the family. Hamya explains that weaving bamboo is one of the ancestors’ techniques in the Shan Region: not only it shelters and protects us during the cold nights, but it also allows for the passage of the river breeze during the hot days.

Tags: myanmar, shan state, myanmar girl, weaving bamboo, rural, unspoiled village

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