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Tierra del Fuego, the Land of Fire

Tierra del Fuego - Land of Fire

The once thriving oil town of Cerro Sombrero now almost appears post-apocalyptic to modern day visitors.  It was an artificial town designed to house the huge numbers of miners and their families that were once required to maintain the thriving fossil fuel industry in the area but in recent years its population and funding have dropped in proportion to the regions production.  This church is one of the few buildings that is still used and maintained; around it lie huge gymnasiums, theatres, swimming pools and community centres that have since fallen into various states of disrepair.  It stands as a physical reminder of Chile's new shift towards renewable energies as the cure for its soaring energy requirements and desire for energy independence.  Incidentally, the people of Chile are becoming more and more engaged in the countries energy direction and legislation.  Chile's primary source of renewable energy, hydroelectric, has come under the spotlight due to its environmental impacts and an increasing awareness of the fact that the vast majority of energy in the country is used to power its Northern copper mines rather than for the energy requirements of its citizens.

CHILE | Sunday, 2 November 2014 | Views [455] | View Larger Image

The once thriving oil town of Cerro Sombrero now almost appears post-apocalyptic to modern day visitors. It was an artificial town designed to house the huge numbers of miners and their families that were once required to maintain the thriving fossil fuel industry in the area but in recent years its population and funding have dropped in proportion to the regions production. This church is one of the few buildings that is still used and maintained; around it lie huge gymnasiums, theatres, swimming pools and community centres that have since fallen into various states of disrepair. It stands as a physical reminder of Chile's new shift towards renewable energies as the cure for its soaring energy requirements and desire for energy independence. Incidentally, the people of Chile are becoming more and more engaged in the countries energy direction and legislation. Chile's primary source of renewable energy, hydroelectric, has come under the spotlight due to its environmental impacts and an increasing awareness of the fact that the vast majority of energy in the country is used to power its Northern copper mines rather than for the energy requirements of its citizens.

Tags: chile, tierra del fuego, church, energy, oil, gas, fossil fuel, renewable energy, renewables, hydroelectric

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